Balance Spa in Tewksbury Offers Aromatic Holiday Specials




There’s more than one way to indulge during the holiday season. There are all the yummy eats and treats and gifts to give and be given. And at Balance Spa in Tewksbury they have divined a way to combine all those things into a completely delicious, deliriously indulgent experience—the Holiday Cookie Facial! The deeply relaxing, sweetly intoxicating treatment smells of pumpkin and spice and everything nice. Applying an essential cleanser, pumpkin enzyme, active moist moisturizer, and a customized soothing yogurt honey mask from Dermalogica, licensed estheticians make the room (and your skin) smell like freshly baked sugar cookies. (To come out craving one is not at all unusual!)

Also on offer is the Gingerbread Massage—another treatment that makes all of the senses come alive. If ginger and clove and cinnamon are among the scents you associate with this season, and hot stone massage makes you happy, then this is the treatment for you. On the other hand, if it’s chocolate that makes you smile most, try the Hot Cocoa Pedicure which features a frothy milk soak, a sugar scrub, a marshmallow massage, and, of course, precision cuticle and nail care.

Owner Nan Vardaro gives her whole team credit for these truly novel notions for holiday time relaxation. Staff seem to enjoy using the products as much as clients relish be pampered with them—they bring a bit more cheer to an already extremely pleasant spa. So if you are pondering holiday gift ideas, skip the cookies…and give the Cookie Facial instead. It’s sweet and healthy!

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