New Spaces/Old Places Lecture

Merging contemporary architecture with historic neighborhoods. A conversation with architects Deborah Epstein and Maryann Thompson.




The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to present, New Spaces/Old Places – Merging Contemporary Architecture with Historic Neighborhoods, the second lecture in its Design/Build lecture series. Join, Deborah Epstein (Epstein Joslin Architects, Inc.), one of the lead architects for the Shalin Liu Performance Center in Rockport, and Maryann Thompson (Maryann Thompson Architects), architect for the modern rebuild of Temple Ahavat Achim in Gloucester, for an evening reception and conversation on Thursday, July 7. The reception will begin at 6:00p.m. in the Design/Build exhibition gallery, followed by the lecture at 7:00p.m. in the Museum’s auditorium.

Epstein and Thompson will speak about the process each firm went through and the challenges they faced in the design and construction of new public buildings in an old New England community. This lecture is part of a series offered in conjunction with the Cape Ann Museum’s exhibition: Design/Build: The Drawings of Phillips & Holloran, Architects, on view from June 4, 2016 to October 9, 2016.

Member cost is $10 per lecture / $25 for the series; Non-member cost is $15 per lecture / $40 for the series. Reservations are required. To purchase tickets or for more information please call (978)283-0455 x10 or email info@capeannmuseum.org.

Tickets can also be ordered online at Eventbrite.

 

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